Jason Calacanis, CEO of blog network Weblogs.inc, has been wondering who the hell has been spending so much time contributing to Digg.

Jason Calacanis, CEO of blog network Weblogs.inc, has been wondering who the hell has been spending so much time contributing to Digg. Digg is a tech-news site where news is submitted by the people, voted on by the people and read by the people. There’s no human editor – just a clever set of algorithms to enhance the quality of the articles rising to the top.

Anmway, Calacanis spotted one user who had submitted 776 stories to Digg over the past 278 days and did some math:

That’s basically three stories every single day without a day off for almost a year. It has to take 15 minutes–on average–to find and publish a decent story to DIGG. So, this person has spent 194 hours on the site in less than a year. If you worked seven hours a day doing this as a day job this would be six weeks of full-time work. So, this person is spending around eight full-time weeks a year.

When he looked further he found that the top 15 Diggers had their own sites and they were digging a lot of their content.

But is this a good or bad thing? You’ll see in the comments section of Calacanis post that some Diggers think it’s a bad thing but it reminds us of a recent interview with Digg founder Kevin Rose (but we can’t remember where – blimmin podcasts, we expect). Rose suggested that in the future community-filtered news sites should be used by bloggers and publishers to submit their own content.

Why do people contribute? – The Jason Calacanis Weblog

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