At PSFK, we’re never too sure whether legal attempts will ever control web users use and ‘mis-use’ of the web but it’s interesting to spot a couple of examples of the law catching up with the activities of folk on the web.

At PSFK, we’re never too sure whether legal attempts will ever control web users use and ‘mis-use’ of the web but it’s interesting to spot a couple of examples of the law catching up with the activities of folk on the web. USA Today reports on the arrest of a man who put 24 up on the web:

Federal authorities have charged a Chicago man with copyright violations for allegedly uploading several episodes of Fox’s 24 on the Internet before the show’s season premiere earlier this year. Jorge Romero, 24, used a website to download the first four episodes of the sixth season of 24 and then uploaded them to LiveDigital.com, according to a federal complaint filed in Los Angeles on Friday.

The episodes appeared online more than a week before their television debuts on Jan. 14 and 15. Romero was charged with one felony count of uploading copyrighted material to a publicly accessible computer network knowing the work was intended for commercial distribution.

The NY Times reports on the arrest of a prolific spammer:

The man, Robert Alan Soloway, is accused of using networks of compromised “zombie” computers to send out millions upon millions of pieces of spam. “He’s one of the top 10 spammers in the world,” said Tim Cranton, senior director for worldwide Internet safety programs for Microsoft. “He’s a huge problem for our customers. This is a very good day.”

Last week, a federal grand jury returned a 35-count indictment against Mr. Soloway charging him with mail fraud, wire fraud, e-mail fraud, aggravated identity theft and money laundering. He pleaded not guilty Wednesday afternoon to all charges after a judge determined that even with four bank accounts seized by the government he was sufficiently well off to pay for his own lawyer. He was detained pending a hearing on Monday.

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