Design of the Year Category Winners Announced

The category winners from the Design Museum’s first Brit Insurance Design of the Year Awards, the not so warmly received new awards programme calling itself the ‘Turner Prize of International Design’ that has replaced the controversial Designer of the Year Awards, have been announced. 100 projects were nominated by ‘a group of internationally respected design […]

The category winners from the Design Museum’s first Brit Insurance Design of the Year Awards, the not so warmly received new awards programme calling itself the ‘Turner Prize of International Design’ that has replaced the controversial Designer of the Year Awards, have been announced. 100 projects were nominated by ‘a group of internationally respected design experts, curators, critics, practitioners and enthusiasts’ (including Rolf Fehlbaum, Lars Muller and Antonio Citterio) and divided within seven categories, with the winners of each going head to head for the ultimate Designer of the Year title on 18th March.

Dezeen gives the lowdown on the finalists and the judges’ thoughts:

Furniture: 100 Chairs in 100 Days, design and manufacture by Martino Gamper

The judges commented, “In contrast to many of today’s designers who explore the latest in material and technical applications to their designs, 100 Chairs in 100 Days by Martino Gamper takes the direction of exploring construction, craftsmanship and materials in an artisan fashion, resulting in a beautiful and poetic collection that brings together the old and new.”

Architecture: Herzog & de Meuron’s Stadium for the Olympic Games in Beijing

The judges commented, “The architecture of the Beijing National Stadium defines the contemporary stadium in a way that has not been seen since the 1972 Olympics in Munich. It embodies the emergence of China as a modern state and crowns the achievements of the remarkable careers of Herzog and de Meuron.”

Fashion: Hussein Chalayan’s Autumn/Winter 07 collection ‘Airborne’

The judges commented, “Chalayan’s ability to incorporate construction and technology alongside his carefully tailored yet wearable clothes continues to surprise and amaze. The Airborne collection proves that fashion can also be about research and innovation by looking to the future rather than the past.”

Graphics: Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition, Creative director Paul Buckley and co art director Helen Yentus

The judges commented, “It’s a great achievement by its creative director Paul Buckley in commissioning a highly skilled group of illustrators and cartoonists whose creative visions have produced some fantastic atmospheric yet very individual covers with high artistic flair and design integrity. ”

Burble

Interactive: Burble London, design by Haque Design + Research Ltd, with Seth Garlock and Rolf Pixley

The judges commented, “Burble London is a real interactive experience rather than a virtual one with a wonderful sense of collectiveness and optimism about it. The understated simplicity is supported by a complex design and production process that embrace the high and low-tech to great effect.”

Product: One Laptop Per Child, design by Yves Béhar

The judges commented, “One Laptop per Child is a fantastic project that is a feat beyond the design itself: a laptop that addresses the educational and technical needs in developing countries, the aspirations for low-cost manufacture and with an ergonomic, robust and fun design that allows children to enhance their means of learning and communication.”

Transport: Mex-x, wheelchair for children by Meyra- Ortopedia Vertriebsgesellschaft mbH

The judges commented, “Mex-x is a great success within its field, presenting a design language far removed from the wheelchair as we know it. Alongside the functional and ergonomic design, which allows the child to grow with the chair, it is has a great sense of style, attention to detail and personal customisation.”

The Financial Times has a rather scathing view on the awards here

Go and judge for yourself until 27th April at the Design Museum

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