Oxfam follows Goodwill, Opens Upscale London Boutique

On the footsteps of Goodwill’s boutique clothing line William Good, which announced its launch late last year, Oxfam has just opened up an upscale shop of its own in the Westbourne Grove area of London. Following a very similar model as William Good, the Oxfam shop will offer mostly secondhand designer clothing, some of which […]

On the footsteps of Goodwill’s boutique clothing line William Good, which announced its launch late last year, Oxfam has just opened up an upscale shop of its own in the Westbourne Grove area of London. Following a very similar model as William Good, the Oxfam shop will offer mostly secondhand designer clothing, some of which has been snipped, sewed, beaded and bedazzled to create one-of-a-kind items. The clothes will retail for a significantly higher price than traditional Oxfam thrift store pieces. Jane Shepherdson, formerly of Topshop, is heading up the creative direction of the new boutique.

Indie London fashion blogger Stylebubble explains:

Oxfam is a type of thrift store in the UK and whilst they have dabbled in the high-fashion stakes before by having the Traid off-shoot stores, this chain of boutiques (they hope to have 250 in the UK…) is an entirely different kettle of fish altogether. Whilst it still sells donated goods, we’re talking designer threads that are have been £££ racked up (Miu Miu skirt at £50, Stella McCartney Jacket at £90…). In addition, you have Fair Trade labels like People Tree and Kazuri, and labels that specialise in fabric recycling like Junky Styling and Kitty Cooper Shoes. Continuing, the recyling theme, London School of Fashion students and other up and coming designers have been asked to use unsold Oxfam stock to make some unique one-off pieces for sale in the boutique and even the volunteers at Oxfam are getting stuck in and making clothes too for sale. So all in all, not your average charity shop and naturally those prices reflect that.

Oxfam boutique’s website

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