iTunes University & Open Source Learning: Is College Obsolete?

Mark Pesce has written an in-depth essay exploring the future of education. He views the rise of open source learning exchanges such as iTunes University and online resource rating services like RateMyProfessors.com as cracks in the wall of the traditional education model. He says that there really is no need to rely on expensive universities […]

Mark Pesce has written an in-depth essay exploring the future of education. He views the rise of open source learning exchanges such as iTunes University and online resource rating services like RateMyProfessors.com as cracks in the wall of the traditional education model. He says that there really is no need to rely on expensive universities for education, when the web makes it so easy for us to do it ourselves.

Pesce explains:

If we take the examples of RateMyProfessors.com and RateMyLectures.com and push them out a little bit, we can see the shape of things to come. Spearheaded by Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, both of which have placed their entire set of lectures online through iTunes University, these educational institutions assert that the lectures themselves aren’t the real reason students spend $50,000 a year to attend these schools; the lectures only have full value in context. This is true, but it discounts the possibility that some individuals or group of individuals might create their own context around the lectures. And this is where the future seems to be pointing.

When broken down to its atomic components, the classroom is an agreement between an instructor and a set of students. The instructor agrees to offer expertise and mentorship, while the students offer their attention and dedication. The question now becomes what role, if any, the educational institution plays in coordinating any of these components. Students can share their ratings online – why wouldn’t they also share their educational goals? Once they’ve pooled their goals, what keeps them from recruiting their own instructor, booking their own classroom, indeed, just doing it all themselves?

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