Creative Paper-Based Visualization: Art Meets Data

Dedicated to featuring the visual beauty of happy marriages between art and data, Infosthetics put out a call to its readers to come up with their best graphical representations of a set of data of their choice. The only catch was they had to construct it out of paper. Charlene Lam of Umeå, Sweden won […]

Dedicated to featuring the visual beauty of happy marriages between art and data, Infosthetics put out a call to its readers to come up with their best graphical representations of a set of data of their choice. The only catch was they had to construct it out of paper. Charlene Lam of Umeå, Sweden won for her submission called ‘Petals’. Her inspiration came from both strips of paper discarded next to a paper trimmer and, because of her extreme northern latitude location, a yearning for sunlight.

Our winter days are short and summer days are long. Using the actual and predicted lengths of daylight for the first of each month in 2009, I created a visualization with 12 “petals”. The outer loop of each petal represents the 24 hours in the day; the inner loop is the length of daylight, ranging from 4h 33m on January 1 to 20h 34m on July 1. I like how the simple lines suggest the passing of time and the cycle of the months as well as the promise of spring to come.

Other submissions like gmapTZ by Marc Pfister might look equally good as a digital model. Marc wanted to use paper to extend a map into a new dimension.

I thought it might be interesting to visualize time over a multi-modal trip. You can see the elapsed time of a bus segment and walking segment. Slower transportation nodes have a steeper line, since the line represents time divided by distance (the inverse of velocity).

More of the really creative entries are featured here.

[via ffffound]

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