Event: The Game Developers Conference 2009

This week game creators from all over the world are gathering in San Francisco for the annual Game Developers Conference (GDC). Popular themes this year will be casual gaming, which consists of games like Guitar Hero, Rock Band and SingStar, social gaming, which are run on social networks like Facebook or MySpace, and  mobile games […]

This week game creators from all over the world are gathering in San Francisco for the annual Game Developers Conference (GDC). Popular themes this year will be casual gaming, which consists of games like Guitar Hero, Rock Band and SingStar, social gaming, which are run on social networks like Facebook or MySpace, and  mobile games (like Mobster) that are played on mobile devices such as the iPhone.

One of the busiest game developers right now is Swedish studio Grin with three upcoming games within the next two months – Bionic Commando, Terminator Salvation and Wanted: Weapons of Fate.

The video game industry is in many ways a diamond in the rough as a marketing channel, despite video game trailers being extremely popular, reaching a wide audience (many trailers get views in the millions). More marketers and brands are realizing that, contrary to the common stereotype, gamers are not just geeks in their teens; they are all ages and sexes. In fact, the average age of a U.S. gamer is slightly above 30, and an average gamer spends several hours per week if not per day with a game.

How will brands work intelligently with game producers? Grin’s Brand Manager, Gunnar Johansson, offered his perspective: “I think that video games will be used as a platform for brands and products in a much larger scale in the future. And not only with products being placed in the game, or a brand on a billboard. I think we will see a lot more creative ways of marketing within the gaming industry soon.”

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