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Prototype Store Checkouts Inspired by Internet Shopping Experiences

The New York Times recently profiled a new modular retail checkout system designed by Frog Design for Intel. The sleek design hides the usual cash...

Dave Pinter
Dave Pinter on March 31, 2009. @DavePinter

The New York Times recently profiled a new modular retail checkout system designed by Frog Design for Intel. The sleek design hides the usual cash drawer and printer clutter. The new system is capable of handling traditional transactions with cash or credit cards as well as a scanner that will accept payment via a customers cell phone. The kiosk’s can actually be set up to be automated, self-checkouts.

Integrated in each unit are touch screens that can offer sales consultation, point out bargains, or let shoppers try out virtual clothing, hair colors and cosmetics onscreen. The units also have the ability to recognize customers and make suggestions based on previous purchases. The idea is to evolve loyalty cards like those already used in grocery or drug stores to cue the system.

Mark Rolston, chief creative officer at Frog Design in San Francisco hopes that some of the successes with internet retailing can be transfered to physical stores in ways customers are already accustomed to.

On the Internet, people get tons of guidance and information. We wanted to bring that volume of information inside the store, too.

[via designmind]

TOPICS: Design & Architecture, Retail
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Dave Pinter is a senior editor at PSFK and focuses on automotive, design and retail news plus NYC culture. Dave is also a New York based concept designer.

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