PSFK Conference New York Speaker: Marc Schiller

We’re excited to have Marc Schiller, co-founder of the Wooster Collective, CEO of Electric Artists and co-founder of MEET At The Apartment speak at PSFK Conference New York on April 2. He will be joining his wife and co-founder of the Wooster Collective and MEET At The Apartment in a discussion on art and commerce. […]

We’re excited to have Marc Schiller, co-founder of the Wooster Collective, CEO of Electric Artists and co-founder of MEET At The Apartment speak at PSFK Conference New York on April 2. He will be joining his wife and co-founder of the Wooster Collective and MEET At The Apartment in a discussion on art and commerce. They will explore the fine line between art and commerce and describe how, with consideration, they can be respectfully blended to create new ideas.

First, who are you and what do you do?

Myself and my wife Sara are founders of the Wooster Collective. Since 2001 we have been documenting and celebrating urban and ephemeral art through salons, publishing, gallery shows and, of course, our website, www.woostercollective.com. In December of 2006, we organized and curated the “11 Spring Street” exhibition which was chosen as one of the top art shows of the year by the New York Times. In addition to Wooster, I’m also the CEO of the marketing agency Electric Artists as well as Co-Founder (along with my wife) of MEET At The Apartment.

In one paragraph, can you explain what themes and ideas you hope to touch upon during the discussion?

Sara and I are interested in how we alter and adjust public space to make it more “livable” and creative. That first moment when you notice a stencil on the pavement, a poster wetpasted to the wall, or a metal sculpture attached to a street sign, you suddenly become transported into another word; a vibrant subculture that eradicates the monotony of daily life. Your commute to work, or that short trip to the store, now becomes an adventure as you search for creativity in unexpected places. Many people are too quick to view street art through the lens of vandalism. They mistakenly believe that the artists are taking beautiful buildings and defacing them. But most street artists look for the rundown building, with paint chipping off, with weeds growing out of the sidewalk. The motivation is to beautify these buildings and to create something truly special. They believe that the art adds something to the city, creating an energy that disappears as the buildings erode.

5 hyperlinks to sites that provide you with inspiration:

www.notcot.org
www.wemadethis.typepad.com/we_made_this
www.c-monster.net/blog1
www.we-make-money-not-art.com
www.juxtapoz.com

Thanks Marc!

To hear more from Marc, get your ticket for PSFK Conference New York now.

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