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Update: Design Our Poster for PSFK Conference New York: Deadline Extended

As we mentioned last week, we are challenging you to get creative for this year’s PSFK Conference NYC.  We’re asking  you to...

Christine Huang
Christine Huang on March 17, 2009.


As we mentioned last week, we are challenging you to get creative for this year’s PSFK Conference NYC.  We’re asking  you to have a go at creating a poster design (it can be of any form – hand drawn, digital graphic, screenprint, wheat paste, etc) that will be shown at our upcoming conference on April 2. And, we’re happy to announce, will be judged by one of PSFK’s favorite graphic artists, Matt W Moore.

The only constraints are that the graphic must include the words “PSFK Conference”, either be 20×30 inches or PowerPoint slide size (or both) AND in some creative way, reflect the ethos of PSFK and our readers – the drive to seek out and use new ideas to make the world around us better.

There are no color restrictions, no style restrictions. If it’s worth it here is the Illustrator File that we use for you to hack and play with all you want.

We will feature all of the entries in our PSFK Flickr group, and our Top Ten favorite poster designs will be printed and displayed at the conference & the Top Five PowerPoint designs will be part of our projected visuals.

We will also feature the Top picks on PSFK.com, alongside interviews with the artists. Artists whose work we feature will also receive a complimentary ticket to the conference.

We’re hoping to encourage more of you to get involved – so we’re moving the deadline to 6PM EST Monday, March 23. Please submit to editorial@psfk.com.

We’re looking forward to seeing your designs! Good luck!

Some technicals: You will retain the rights to all original work you produce and by submitting your work to us you grant us an ongoing license to use the imagery with and at our events. We grant you the right to rework our logo and brand identity as you see fit. Oh, and you will need to make sure you have the rights to use anybody else’s imagery or other content in your work. Hmm, there’s probably a Creative Commons clause that covers all this. But we’re sure you get the picture.

Thinking...