1.6 Million Jewel Beetles Unite To Form Ceiling Masterpiece

Flemish artist Jan Fabre has created the ‘Heaven of Delight’ using 1.6 million Buprestidae beetles. Fabre and his team of thirty people took 4 months to glue all of the beetle shells to the ceiling of the Royal Palace in Brussels. The jewel beetles were obtained from universities and connections Fabre had in the open […]

Flemish artist Jan Fabre has created the ‘Heaven of Delight’ using 1.6 million Buprestidae beetles. Fabre and his team of thirty people took 4 months to glue all of the beetle shells to the ceiling of the Royal Palace in Brussels.

The jewel beetles were obtained from universities and connections Fabre had in the open market. They are a non-protected species that are abundant in certain countries like Thailand where the beetle is fried and eaten.

Jan Fabre on his creation:

As far as the ceiling is concerned, I first created a wide variety of forms and patterns by gluing beetles onto small surfaces. Then I told my 29 assistants that they could start inventing forms, knowing full well what they would come up with. This process allowed me to discover who was good at what type of pattern. Once I had this information, I could assign different areas of the ceiling to different assistants.

Sculpture

[via makezine]

Quantcast