Twitter Book Review

Tweetboox and similar services allow people to share their thoughts the way they want to – in fact I’m sure Floyd and his collaborators will find ways to adapt their Twitter output to make even more interesting outputs.

Last night, Floyd Hayes showed me a book created by the the service Tweetboox. Like some others, my immediate reaction is why bother and also why the waste of paper (a tweet is printed one to a page in Floyd’s book). Surely these random tweets were so personal and timely that a historic catalog of them wouldn’t make sense. But when I looked back through his book it turned into a story about my friend. You were left wondering ‘I wonder what was happening in his life then’ and at others I was left guessing what some abrupt prose really meant. The way these books isolate comments and then freeze them in time in intriguing and captivating.

Writing for Wired, Frederik Joelving is critical of the venture and the motivation that people would have in creating such a book. He says that this writing is all about ego (pot calling kettle black, no?) and then goes on to compare the service with Blurb – a service that he didn’t expect would survive either. Joelving has got it wrong (again). Blurb allowed thousands of creative minds to produce books on the topics they wanted, in the style they wanted in the time they wanted. Tweetboox and similar services allow people to share their thoughts the way they want to – in fact I’m sure Floyd and his collaborators will find ways to adapt their Twitter output to make even more interesting outputs.

Criticizing the mass sharing of ideas is elitist pomp by yet another journalist who still believes it’s the refrain of only those with his training to share ideas and stories.

twitter.com/floyd_hayes

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