Young Chinese Parents Head to “Social-Parenting” Sites For Advice

A recent Forbes article describes a rash of new Chinese parents logging on to “social-parenting” sites such as Babytree to offer advice and garner parenting tips from other new Chinese parents.

A recent Forbes article describes a rash of new Chinese parents logging on to “social-parenting” sites such as Babytree to offer advice and garner parenting tips from other new Chinese parents.

While this is not a new phenomena, it points to a potential societal change amongst young Chinese parents from a familial baby-raising environment, to one where what is best for Little Xiao is not solely dictated by his Grandparents, but instead entrusted to thousands of faceless online members.

However, many of these Post-80’s Chinese parents will not follow advice to spoil and restrict their babies, learning offline that this has led to China’s 90’s generation children as being difficult and spoiled. China Daily spoke with Jiang Yao, a 27 year old Middle School Teacher who shared this viewpoint.

“My students, the post 90s, are a group of spoiled and difficult children. I won’t be an old-styled mom and I won’t bring my child up like that,” said Jiang, explaining the more restriction, the more disobedience.

This unusual hybrid of embracing new technology and resorting to less restricted parenting methods bodes interesting results for China’s yet-to-be-named youth of ’00. We will let you know in ten years how it turns out.

Forbes: Chinese Parents Discover Social Networking

Young Chinese Parents Head to "Social-Parenting" Sites For Advice

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