Nomadic Plants: The Promise Of Wetware

Nomadic Plants turn ecological balance into a microbial processor.

We talk a lot about software and hardware; however, Gilberto Esparza‘s Nomadic Plants offers a new and possibly viable evolution of the machine. Essentially, plants and microorganisms live within a robot that is able to register when the organisms need water and then forages for a water source. What’s interesting here, is how ecological balance is turned into a processor, where the energy created is returned back to the object. But, how do we put this model into a human perspective? Esparza explains:

The fact that a new species, the by-product of those alienating processes, appears -merely by coexisting- in those areas of ecological disaster represents a manifestation pointing to the serious social and environmental impacts on communities that once depended on rivers, now the source of their ailments. At this point, it is important to highlight the ambiguous potential of the transforming power of the human species, due to its ability to destroy but also to restore. For that reason, what is required is a new way of thinking, which would position us as antibodies on the planet, and a proper understanding of the importance of living in symbiosis with our planet and with all species.

Nomadic Plants are on display at Laboral Art and Industrial Creation Centre.

We Make Money Not Art: Nomadic Plants

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