Findings From The IBM Smarter Buildings Survey

A survey by IBM shows that office buildings in US lag behind the other modern systems in terms of automation and efficiency.

IBM conducted the Smarter Buildings Survey to better understand consumer thinking on urban infrastructure in the wake of critical climate and economic concerns. The key finding from the survey was that office buildings in the US have not kept pace with the automation and efficiency levels of other areas of life such as transportation systems, electrical grids and automobiles, which results in added costs and loss of productivity.

Here are some of the other findings from the study, which surveyed over 6,000 office workers in 16 U.S. cities on issues ranging from office building automation and security to elevator reliability and conservation.

The cumulative time that office workers spent stuck in elevators in the past 12 months totaled 33 years across the 16 cities.

Findings From The IBM Smarter Buildings Survey 2

The cumulative time that office workers spent waiting for elevators in the past 12 months totaled 92 years across the 16 cities. 25 percent said that the elevators in their office buildings are poorly coordinated – for example, too few or too many at any one time, or insufficient capacity.

Los Angeles was ranked first among all cities in terms of efficiency in a number of key categories surveyed such as elevator wait times, Internet access and automated sensors in rooms.

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IBM says that bridging the gap between the rate of automation in modern systems and levels of efficiency in office buildings can reduce energy and maintenance costs, as well as create a more productive and healthier workforce.

IBM: “IBM Survey Shows Strengths, Gaps in U.S. Office Buildings”

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