Quantum Teleportation Leaps Forward

Scientists in China have successfully teleported particles farther than ever before.

The idea of teleportation has often been a figment of science fiction, but scientists have been experimenting with the concept for years, sending information and signals across an aligned area of space.

Recently, scientists in China broke a new record for quantum teleportation–the process by which the quantum state of one object is transferred to another object across a disparate distance–by transporting particles across ten miles.

Popular Science explains:

“It works by entangling two objects, like photons or ions. The first teleportation experiments involved beams of light. Once the objects are entangled, they’re connected by an invisible wave, like a thread or umbilical cord. That means when something is done to one object, it immediately happens to the other object, too. Einstein called this “spooky action at a distance.

In the latest experiment, researchers entangled two photons and zapped the higher-energy one through a special 10-mile-long free-space tunnel, instead of a fiber one. The distant photon was still able to respond to the changes in state of the photon left behind, an unprecedented achievement.”

This recent advancement is significant, as experiments with particles in the past have only achieved teleportation a few hundred feet apart. By improving these efforts, information and data could potentially travel far distances without any traditional signal transmission.

Experimental free-space quantum teleportation

[via Popular Science]

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