The Invisible Greening Of The Starbucks Experience

Starbucks’ new Spring and Crosby location is part of an experimental batch of 12 stores around the world, testing the feasibility of Starbucks’ recent initiative to have all new global locations LEED-certified by the end of the year.

Recently, we were invited to the opening of the newly renovated Starbucks store located at Spring and Crosby Streets, just a few blocks from PSFK’s New York offices in SoHo.

The coffeehouse has been a popular and frequented location for the past 15 years among tourists and neighborhood folk alike, but has recently undergone a vast rehab to showcase a locally and sustainably sourced design and functionality. Why?

The Spring and Crosby location is part of an experimental batch of 12 stores around the world, testing the feasibility of Starbucks’ recent initiative to have all new global locations LEED-certified by the end of the year. Each store is located in a different “bio-region” of the world–Kyoto, Japan; Lisbon, Portugal; Toronto, Canada; and Seattle among them–to test the varying shifts in energy use and locally sourced materials

The true challenge of the Starbucks redesign project is to maintain the brand’s residential, “3rd place” aesthetic with reused and recycled elements that mitigate carbon footprint and lessen energy and water consumption.

To achieve this seamless transition of materials, Tim Pfeiffer and his design team used reclaimed building materials throughout the store’s wooden floors and counter tops. The team also worked with GE to create LED lights that could meet LEED certification standards while maintaining the warm ambiance that existed with previous lights.

Most users might not notice the sustainable efforts of the materials and redesign, but there are subtle signs throughout the store that allow for the discovery and understanding of the renovation process that took place.

The Invisible Greening Of The Starbucks Experience

Starbucks

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