Moore’s Law, Sensors, And An Impending Data Explosion

How can brands prepare to play a role within our information-rich future?

A recent article in The New York Times discussed the role that the internet of things, cloud computing, and user-generated content continue to play in increasing the amount of digital data available at a rate that exceeds Moore’s Law. Referencing Google VP Marissa Mayer and HP Labs’ Parthasarathy Ranganathan, writer Richard Macmanus made a few points that got us thinking about whether this impending data explosion will mark a mostly positive shift, who will be in a position to best interpret and utilize that data – and of course, how. We’ve culled some of the key notions that Macmanus’ article will have us keeping an eye out as we move towards a more actualized internet of things:

  • Three key changes to Internet data in recent times: Speed (real-time data), scale (unprecedented processing power) and sensors (new kinds of data)
  • A “sensor revolution” includes data from mobile phones, which have senses almost like people – an eye (camera), ears (microphone) and skin (touch screen)
  • “Ubiquitous nanosensors” can have multiple dimensions per sensor, including navigation, sound, air flow, temperature, pressure and location
  • There will soon be millions of sensors working in real-time, with data sampled every second
  • Different applications for this data will include retail, defense, traffic, seismic, oil, wildlife, weather and climate modeling
  • What role can brands in the tech space play? HP sees itself as providing the computing platform required to deal with the massive influx of data, and the complexity of processing real-time
  • Google sees itself as a provider of exascale web services – which could help fight climate change

What about the non-HP and Google’s of the world? Other brands should already be investing in the infrastructure, knowledge and discipline to mine, analyze – and identify opportunities to better meet the evolving needs of a changing consumer market – lest they risk losing a consumer that has moved onto other brands that better met their changing needs.

New York Times, “The Coming Data Explosion

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