The Most Imaginative Social Good Campaigns

Forbes magazine has compiled a visual collection of the most imaginative csr initiatives.

Forbes has recapped the most imaginative social good campaigns from the past couple of years, citing some well-publicized campaigns, including (Product) RED, Pepsi Refresh and even the recent Levi’s ‘Go Forth’ campaign. Some of the perhaps less-often-cited campaigns that we found particularly noteworthy included:

  • Tide’s Loads of Hope program started in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, when Procter & Gamble teamed up with Feeding America to help New Orleans families. The campaign brings laundry facilities to places struck by disaster, and volunteers wash, dry and fold clothes for free. It recently tended to communities afflicted by floods in Mississippi and Tennessee, and it has washed more than 33,000 loads of laundry since it started. Tide has also sold more than 65,000 vintage-style T-shirts to raise money to help families affected by natural disasters.
  • Twitter has launched its own wine label to promote literacy, on the premise that “If you can’t read, you can’t tweet.” The site is collaborating with Crushpad, a San Francisco-based winery, and the nonprofit organization Room to Read for the Fledgling Initiative. Customers can pre-order $20 bottles of pinot noir or Chardonnay and follow the wine making process via Twitter. The wine is scheduled to be bottled in August, and $5 for every bottle sold will be donated to Room to Read for literacy initiatives in India.
  • Macy’s “Believe” campaign draws on the famous 19th-century newspaper editorial that proclaimed, “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus” and said he “exists as certainly as love and generosity.” The campaign, created by JWT, New York, benefits the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Children write letters about why they believe in Santa and drop them in R.H. Macy Santa mailboxes; Macy’s donates $1 for each letter, giving $1 million both in 2008 and 2009 to Make-A-Wish for the first million letters it received.
  • H&R Block‘s “Dollars & Sense” program addresses the lack of financial literacy among teenagers. It teaches high school students to be financially fit and to better manage their money, promoting real-world skills like balancing a budget and avoiding debt. The company donates more than $1 million annually to high schools for personal finance curricula and holds a challenge in which students compete for scholarships by showing how financially savvy they are.

Forbes: “In Pictures: The Most Imaginative CSR Campaigns”

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