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Curving Ergo Crosswalk

Can tweaking the design of a common pedestrian crossing result in fewer accidents?

Naresh Kumar
Naresh Kumar on September 6, 2010.

One of the shortlisted entries in the Seoul International Design Competition 2010 that stood out was the ‘Ergo Crosswalk’ by Korean designer Jae Min Lim. In his project, Jae tweaks the traditional shapes of Zebra crossing into curves to reflect how people jaywalk on roads.

Ergo Crosswalk-Project Makes Case For Altering Zebra Stripes To Minimize Road Accidents 2

He believes that by carving out a wider road area, there will be fewer accidents involving pedestrians. Moreover, the Zebra stripes will have built-in LEDs that glow red or green to indicate when it is safe for people to cross. The designer says:

“When people cross roads, they tend to take the fastest shortcut. they sometimes do it intentionally, but mostly it is an unconscious act. this kind of action violates the traffic regulations and sometimes threatens the safety of the pedestrians. The ‘ergo crosswalk’ is a design that makes people follow the law, as well as consider their habits or
unconscious actions. it will encourage pedestrians to follow the lines of the cross walk and protect them
from any potential danger. If regulations cannot force people to follow the law, wouldn’t it be more reasonable to
change the law and fulfill the main purpose of keeping the safety and convenience of the pedestrian…”

Seoul International Design Competition 2010

Thinking...