The Instantising Of Online Search Platforms

The introduction of Google Instant has influenced a slew of new sites that build upon the notion of practical, predictable query mechanisms.

As evidenced last week by the release of Google Instant, predictive, immediate search will likely change the speed and habitual activity of online findings.  So much in fact, that the influence on other platforms has been, well, fairly instant.

The new site Instantise now provides over 16 search apps built upon the concept, with the ability to search with Google’s inventive quickness at heart. But two such sites have lead the conversation and application of the trend: YouTube Instant and iTunes Instant.

YouTube Instant was built by Stanford University student, Feross Aboukhadijeh, on a dare from a classmate in three hours. It initiates YouTube video playing upon each search query, and went viral immediately as the conversation around Google Instant was still fresh in people’s minds. He was later offered a job from the company.

itunes instant search

iTunes Instant was constructed the same week, by 15-year-old entrepreneur (and also founder of Pitch.ly and OneExtraLap), Stephen Ou, of California, after noticing the slow speed and complexity of the music platform’s existing interface. The site pulls from iTunes’ vast library of songs, artists and applications, and artists to provide a quicker search.

The development of such sites is also relatively simple.  Building upon open APIs, the platforms provide a service that utilizes existing databases of information–just making them more accessible through speed.  It’s interesting, too, to observe how the agility of this approach by developers has mimicked the very applications themselves: quick, thoughtful and practical searching will continue to impact the online experience, no matter the intention or context.

YouTube Instant

iTunes Instant

About Google Instant

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