Peep Insights: Pop Up Eateries, Food Trucks & The Justice Food League

New York is home to some of the best food, and often there is the price tag to match. Lately, chefs are focusing on “cheap eats” that don’t sacrifice the quality New York is known for.

New York is home to some of the best food, and often there is the price tag to match. Lately, chefs are focusing on “cheap eats” that don’t sacrifice the quality New York is known for. The editors of New York magazine have catalogued a list of venues that match wallet and palette through out the five boroughs. Recently, the Hester Street Fair, presented by New York Magazine, showcased favorite food finds, from street cart to delectable dive style.

Over ten thousand people crammed Hester Street to sample tastes from 40 vendors; Saturday’s Grub Street food festival was a showcase of New York food, accessible to all. Sliders, tacos, biscuits and slushies offered an easy to consume menu for any American gourmet. New York rarely gets credit for its “democratic food,” beyond its most recognized array of world renowned pizza, Grub Street offers a range of affordable eats from the melting pot of citizens that live on and around the Island.

The Lukes and Ditch Plains lobster rolls were a popular hit with lines over 20 minutes and a lobster story competition. Mexicue had an endless line of happy taco fans with BBQ beets and crumbled goat cheese. My personal favorite, was the Bacon Marmalade, and while Bacon may be one of the trendiest ingredients of late, found in chocolate and even ice cream, it’s still delicious. Kelvin Slush, rookie vendor of the year, topped off the desserts with “mix and match” slushies.

The Vendys, called “the Oscars of food for the real New York” by Chef Mario Batali, were announced last month on Governors Island. New York City’s annual competition for the title of Best Street Food Vendor is also a fundraiser to support the Street Vendor Project of the Urban Justice Center, a nonprofit organization that provides a voice for the thousands of people who sell food and merchandise on the streets of our city.” Music was provided by Andrew W.K. and Santos party house “to help dance off some of the extra calories. ” From pop up eateries to food trucks New Yorkers hunger for good food. The economy helps creativity flourish, with “cheap eats” and street food spreading democracy to taste buds.

Across the country in Colorado, food vans and fans came out in their best 80s garb to dine and dance. The Justice Food League, “a band of food superheroes trying to save Denver one meal at a time,” hosted its monthly meet-up. Beyond wearing capes, many of the trucks are refurbished relics saved from the junkyard, fitted with solar power, bio fuels and local ingredients. Although the Mile High City is home to the dinner classic Denver omelet, these vendors are reinventing food on wheels to create affordable tongue twisting tastes. From kimchi tacos, truffle mac-n-cheese balls to tempeh bacon banh mi (bacon for vegans) each truck was a blast. From Grub street to Main street its great to see food fans making their passions sustainable and available for all.

Contributed by Wesley Robison

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