Real-Life Superheroes Patrol Streets Of Seattle

In a comic book come to life, Phoenix Jones and his Rain City Superhero Movement wear masks, tights and capes at night to fight crime.

We reported on the Real-Life Superhero Movement a few years ago, a now the phenomenon is gaining steam in Seattle, Washington. Local news station KIRO reports on an area man whose car was saved from being broken into by another man dressed in a flashy black and gold superhero costume. The masked man goes by name Phoenix Jones and has been gaining media attention for patrolling the streets at night armed with martial arts training, taser nightstick, mace spray and bulletproof tights. The KIRO video reveals his (now not-so) secret lair behind a comic book store bookshelf and belief that Real Life Superheroes not only fight crime, but inspire:

“So when I walk into a neighborhood, criminals leave because they see the suit,” said Phoenix. “I symbolize that the average person doesn’t have to walk around and see bad things and do nothing.”

As member of the Rain City Superhero Movement, Phoenix Jones operates in compliance and communication with local law enforcement, as Seattlecrime.com reports:

The Seattle Police Department’s Robbery unit sent out an internal memo to officers, warning them that they may soon encounter Jones or his fellow costumed do-gooders—”Thorn,” Buster Doe,” “Green Reaper,” “Gemini,” “No Name,” “Catastrophe,” “Thunder 88,” and “Penelope,” according to the memo—who have popped up on Seattle’s increasingly weird streets over the last year.

Nothing is generally illegal about dressing up in costume and fighting crime as Seattle Police Department spokesman Jeff Kappel tells the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

“There’s nothing wrong with citizens getting involved with the criminal justice process — as long as they follow it all the way through”

And just like in the comics, a debate rages whether these are caped crusaders or masked vigilantes. Just see the comments section below.

KIRO TV: Real-Life Superhero Walks Streets, Fighting Crime

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