Slash
Intelligent Apparel Captures Performance Metrics For Pro Athletes

New developments in wearable technology are being tested by the NFL and Under Armour.

Kyle Studstill
Kyle Studstill on February 24, 2011.

Under Armour is testing a line of prototype athletic gear for 10-30 competitors at this year’s NFL Combine training camp. With a core sensor weighing less than 4.5 ounces, the apparel captures motion, heart rate, acceleration, g force and a host of other data. The removable pack contains 2 gigabytes of storage for constantly capturing and monitoring performance data.

We’re seeing wearable technology develop quickly in the sports world, particularly because of the opportunity movement data provides to develop better techniques for both improved performance and injury prevention. See a recent example at Sensor-Fitted Baseball Shirt Tracks Pitching Technique, Prevents Injuries.

Wired reports:

Somewhere between 10 and 30 prospects, including Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Cam Newton, will wear the Under Armour E39 compression shirt during Combine workouts, which begin this Saturday. It weighs less than 4.5 oz and is made from the same material as the rest of the company’s line of compression-based apparel.

Yet just below the sternum, the shirt also contains a removable sensor pack called a “bug” that holds atriaxial accelerometer, a processor and 2 gigabytes of storage. The information collected can be broadcast via Bluetooth to smartphones, iPads and laptops so that scouts and trainers can view the power and efficiency of each athlete’s movements. Heart-rate and breathing-rate monitors are placed on both sides of the sensor pack, helping to gather even more intel from the body’s core.

Under Armour

WIRED Playbook: “In-Chest Sensors Gather Data on NFL Prospects”

Thinking...