Nokia And Burton Bring Their Connected Snowboards To The Public

Initially developing a concept method to passively display data onto connected phones, the team is now showcasing the technology in public trials and opening up the tool set for developers.

Earlier we covered the concept work Nokia and Burton have been doing together to capture real-time data in the post Mobile-Connected Snowboards Turn Extreme Sports Into A Game. Initially developing a concept method to passively display data from skateboards and snowboards onto connected phones, the team is now showcasing the technology in public trials and opening up the tool set for developers so that the surrounding community can participate in building their own versions of boards that track both motion and biometrics from riders.

The project is of note because it is a manifestation of new methods of producing connected goods. A traditional model might be for a manufacturer like Burton to build snowboards with the ability to track data,¬†purchasing microprocessors and designing boards engineered to capture motion. Instead, what is happening here is that this process is being distributed among people interested in the end use of the product and the data it collects, such that the actual producers are the developers and hackers putting together their own prototypes. These developers are then able to capture valuable data in ways that are mashed with other platforms – given the nature of the hacks we are seeing driven by the Kinect, it’s entirely feasible that we soon see connected snowboards forming the foundation for video games that render actual-world snowboard runs, potentially allowing for competing against snowboarders as they race.

Watch a video demonstration below of the public trials, showing the motion and biometric data collected in real-time as riders make their snowboarding runs:

Nokia Push Snowboarding

Comments

Quantcast