Anything Goes In Recession Design

The DIY resourcefulness required during our economic crisis may have inspired a new ‘undecorate’ design movement.

Just as Americans adopted the frugally-inspired aesthetics of European modernism following the Great Depression, the wake of our recent recession has many wondering which decor will come to reflect our own financial turmoil. As suggested by The New York Times Magazine, one answer may lie in the recently published Undecorate by Christiane Lemieux.

The Undecorate movement rose amidst the angst of our economic recession. In contrast to minimalism’s designer imposed frugality, undecorate is a populist movement, unyielding to the constraints of any design discipline. As written in The Times the undecorate movement:

takes subversive pleasure in breaking the rules. Harmony and balance are passé. Excess is encouraged. Fabrics are mismatched. Wallpaper spreads over moldings and ceilings.

Most of all, the movement is said to be defined by accessibility, both with respect to the materials used and the topic information available:

As shelter magazines foundered, up came a new breed of self-curating, design-smart amateurs spurred to resourcefulness by the recession and assisted by the Internet in finding materials and furnishings at deep discounts. The result is an outpouring of homegrown inventiveness — sofas upholstered with burlap coffee sacks, stereo speakers made from Ikea salad bowls, party decorations conscripted as permanent ornamentation.

The principle tenet, the article suggests, is that there is no guiding principle.

DwellStudio

[via The New York Times Magazine]

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