Underwater Art Breathes Life Into Depleted Coral Reefs

A Kickstarter-funded initiative will place chemically balanced artwork at the bottom of the ocean to help nourish coral reefs back to health.

Senior TED Fellow and artist Colleen Flanigan was invited to share her Biorock designs with the MUSA (Museo Subacuatico de Arte),  the world’s first underwater museum located off the coasts of Cancun, Islas Mujeres and Punta Nizuc in Mexico. Colleen’s artwork is comprised of metal structures that will chemically offset the damage done to coral reefs from pollution and global warming. When her artwork is positioned on the ocean floor, it will serve as regenerative base for coral reef to feed off off of and flourish.

As described by Brainpickings:

As the temperature and acidity of the world’s oceans continue to rise under the effects of global warming, these new sculptures offer corals a vital alkaline environment: Using a low-voltage electrical current, the installations raise the pH of seawater to attract limestone minerals, which adhere to the metal matrix and help corals get the calcium carbonate they need to build their exoskeletons.

Colleen has launched a Kickstarter platform to fund it all. The money will go to welding equipment, supplies, power sources, boat rentals, SCUBA tanks, and hiring a professional filmmaker to capture it all.

See video from the project below.



Colleen Flanigan

[via Brain Pickings]

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