On The iPhone 5 And Limits Of Necessary Technology

The rumor mill continues to spin tales of 8MP cameras, summer release, and increased processor speeds. Having that and general mobile developments on our minds, we reached out to our global network of experts on The Purple List for some thoughts.

The iPhone 5 rumor mill continues to spin tales of 8MP cameras, summer release, and increased processor speeds. Having that and general mobile developments on our minds, we reached out to our global network of experts onĀ The Purple List asking, ‘Is there a point at which mobile technology advances will become null and moot for normal users? Are we approaching it or there yet?’

Here is what they had to say:

Michael Myers, an expert in the Retail Industry from Denver:

There will always be early adopters that want to push what a phone can do and yes, I believe we may getting close to what most users (“the masses”) will want to do. Smartphones now help you with the who, what, where and when and yet some people still use them only for phones. That said, there is always the chance that a new feature/capability will gain enough critical mass to be adopted by the masses. NFC + RFID (http://www.cruc.es/nfc-rfid-much-coolness-video/) has great potential for brick & mortar businesses.

Mobile Augmented Reality is also example of a technology that may or may not take off. Word Lense is a great example of what it can do (http://www.cruc.es/amazing-augmented-reality-app-called-word-lens-video/) and I’m hopeful that there will be many other applications for that piece of technology.

It’s important to remember that most of the people online still use it for email, looking at the news, Facebook and researching vacations. How those people handle a transition to the mobile will be interesting and they are as you said, normal users.

Nishad Ramachandran, an expert in the Marketing and Advertising Industry from Mumbai:

I think this is a question that goes back to all of technology from our prehistory…

I think there will always be ways to advance technology so that normal people find it useful.

Like maps. It’s been around for more than 5 years, and yet very few people really use it in places like India. And the ones who use it, like me, can’t live without it.

A while ago, I had been at this seminar in India, where a person was telling us that more people in India use the phone camera, than SMS, as the levels of English literacy is a bit low here and for people inputting stuff via the keypad is still cumbersome.

Even for people who use a lot of features on the phone, there are some near term uses like NFC, AR and others that Michael refers to.

There are others that will require more bandwidth, like telepresence… Also, I look up to companies like Apple to move beyond touch and other experiences to areas like implantable phones and stuff.

To me the march will continue, pulling in early adopters who suffer from shiny object syndrome, and the laggards who will continue to play catch up with ideas that they will find easy, valuable and useful.

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