Unpacking A Repressive Directive By Facebook

Ignoring common practices of investigative due diligence, Facebook has repeatedly allowed unverified accounts to file complaints and lock out company pages.

An unverified, third-party complaint to Facebook has blocked yet another company’s page on the social networking site. The technology blog Ars Technica recently had their Facebook page locked out for alleged copyright infringement. The real issue, according to Ars Technica and other organizations placed in similar exile, is that they have been condemned harshly first without Facebook having completed the due diligence of even verifying if the complainant’s contact information is correct. Ken Fischer, an editor at Ars Technica suggested it seems paradoxical that Facebook treat their most valuable assets (users) in this way.

Sarah Perez of Read Write Web describes another important point of contention:

However, what Facebook does not do is verify whether or not any of that contact information is accurate. While doing so may be an administrative burden the network could not afford, it does not even take the simple step of verifying the reporter’s email address is valid.

…Scam artists, as you may have guessed, have discovered this loophole. In one case, with Hamard Dar’s Rewriting Technology site, the page went down for over a month. Dar says he was targeted for money. “He wanted me to pay him…to get the page back,” he told us. Dar didn’t go for that option, however, because there was no guarantee the scammer would return the page once paid. Instead, Dar ran his own personal investigation until he discovered the person involved and threatened him to withdraw the complaint, saying he would report him to U.S. cyber crime enforcement (the scam artist lives in Chicago). The page was then returned.

Ars Technica: “Facebook shoots first, ignores questions later; account lock-out attack works (Update X)”

[via Dangerous Minds]

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