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Eco-Friendly? Depends On Who Says So

Eco-Friendly? Depends On Who Says So
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Technology companies do not have one standard on which to base appraisals of how "green" they are.

by Valentina Park
  • 10 june 2011

 

In the race to be green and technologically relevant, both consumer electronic brands and consumers are going out of the way to sell or buy energy-conserving products. Major league players such as AT&T and Apple are either highlighting their eco-friendly practices or making more eco-friendly decisions. Last fall, AT&T unveiled a line of $30 texting phones that are built with “70% recycled post-consumer plastics and packaged in 80% recycled post-consumer paper,” according to USA Today reporter, Edward C. Baig. Apple, which has been environmentally conscious for a while, has pointing out that their Mac computers are arsenic and PVC-free and meet EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) gold standards.┬áSmaller companies such as ThinkEco have emerged with devices that help decrease the amount of energy consumed by current electronics.

Although these companies are focused on creating more eco-friendly products, some experts are hesitant to say that these attempts are “green” enough. The standards of a eco-friendly device are measured differently depending on the company. For example, EPEAT Gold standards differ from Energy Star’s guidelines. Steven Castle, co-founder of GreenTech Advocates, worries, “how green can you be if you’re going to run out and buy an iPhone 5 so soon after the iPhone 4?” In other words, the tech market is constantly innovating new products that the environment is still being harmed regardless of these green practices.

[via USA Today]

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