We Make Money Not Art: Urban Stargazing

Régine Debatty learns about urban stargazing and retells stories behind man-made constellations that have been designed and installed throughout London.

Back from the Royal College of Art Summer Show in London, Régine Debatty, art show curator and writer of the “We Make Money Not Art” blog,  shares what she learned about urban stargazing:

One of the most fascinating and clever projects i’ve seen so far comes from my favourite Design Product platform: the one headed by Onkar Kular and Sebastian Noel.

Because they spend most of their time in an artificially lit environment, city dwellers have long stopped paying attention to those natural night lights coming from billions of light years away: the stars.

With his project Urban StargazingOscar Lhermitte attempts to have us raise our head again up to the stars in the city sky by adding new constellations that narrate contemporary myths about London. Twelve groups of stars have been designed and installed guerrilla-style at different locations in the city. They can only be observed by the naked eye at night time and from the ground they look so uncannily like the old constellations that you might never notice that any change has occurred. Each of these new constellations have a story that is directly relevant to the Londoner.

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The V2 / 51.52892, -0.05971

Take the V2 for example. This constellation refers to the bombing of London during the Second World War. During ‘the Blitz‘, V-2 rockets were hitting London over a period of several months, destroying over a million of houses and killing around 20,000 civilians. Bethnal Green tube station was used as an air-raid shelter but on 3rd March 1943, after a false alert, 172 people died of suffocation while rushing into the shelter. The V2 constellation now shines above Bethnal Green.

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The Brick / 51.54249, -0.05883

Lhermitte told me the fascinating story behind the Mosquito constellation. It has recently been discovered that the London underground houses its own peculiar species of mosquitoApparently, they mutated from the bird-biting form that colonised the underground when it was built in the last century to a variety that nips rats, mice and maintenance workers. Underground mosquitoes are reluctant to mate with their outdoor cousins, indicating that they have become a separate species — a process that normally takes thousands of years rather than decades. These underground mosquitoes naturally deserved to get their own constellation.

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The Mosquito / 51.52873, -0.04058

(To continue reading, click here.)

Régine Debatty is the creator of “We Make Money Not Art” blog and an art show curator. She has also spoken at several conferences and festivals about the way artists, hackers and interaction designers (mis)use technology. Learn more about Régine Debatty.

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