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30 Creative Projects In 30 Days

PSFK interviews Carmichael Lynch's Creative Labs on their ambitious month-long competition with the goal to inspire.

Plus Aziz
Plus Aziz on July 5, 2011. @plusaziz

Throughout June, 30 Days of Creativity nurtured and motivated a community of contributors to produce a creative project daily. The initiative was developed by Carmichael Lynch’s Creation Lab, a Minneapolis-based agency, and we got in contact with their team for some insight on the project’s goals and ambitions:

Tell us about 30 Days of Creativity — what motivated you to launch this program?

We understand that constraints are needed to inspire creativity. We all want to be creative, but oftentimes push off our ideas with the intent of doing it “later.” When you set-up a particular time allotment, it pushes us and inspires us to do the things we usually put off for another day.

We wanted to develop a social initiative that had the potential to connect people from all over the world – regardless of age, race, or industry background – and direct them towards one common objective: creation. We believe 30 Days of Creativity has the potential to do this because we were designing a community hub for people to come to share, work together and support each others’ work.

What did you expect in terms of creative output?

Output differs radically. Last year we saw the development of original design work, music, videos and art and crafts projects. We like to keep the expectations of “creative output” completely open. And, above all, we never judge anyone’s creative output. Someone may decide to cook a meal differently or try a new hairstyle – that part isn’t up to us, it’s about our creators and what they feel like doing. We merely intend to shepherd the process and keep them motivated.

What cultural trends and innovations do you expect will impact this year’s inventions?

We saw people come together from like-minded communities to collaborate. We saw people contribute from a host of online locations – Vimeo, Youtube, Pinterest, blogs, Twitter etc. With the large growth in places to share work online and communicate with our networks, we expect to see a lot of technological advances in terms of sharing, building and working together.

We saw contributors using our guardrails to guide their creation: not only the time constraint of 30 days, but also with our calendar for inspiration, where we uploaded content daily to inspire our community. We also were curious to see any shifts in the use of our hashtag #30daysofcreativity – we expected to see people work off of that or build unique hashtags to combine and further compartmentalize the type of work that’s being created.

How was this year’s ’30 days’ different than the last?

We’ve put a lot of effort towards connecting with the right people, business and publications online to further our message. We think this will result in more awareness and contributions. With more pledgers in a host of different industries and environments, we not only expect to see more creation – we expect to see more diverse creation.

Carmichael Lynch

30 Days of Creativity

Thinking...