Behind Google’s New Design Update

The tech company’s creative team say they’re working on a project to bring users a new and improved Google experience that will roll out across all brands over the next few months.

If you’ve been using the internet recently – not just a new social network – you probably have noticed that Google has been updating it’s design. The new homepage features a smaller logo and links have been moved to the top and bottom edges of the browser “for a cleaner look.” The layout changes to the results pages are subtle but the search bar now comes boxed and there are new icons to present the tech company’s new services.

The team there say that they’re working on a project to bring users a new and improved Google experience that will roll out over the next few months. Over on Google’s blog, they provide this explanation about their work:

The way people use and experience the web is evolving, and our goal is to give you a more seamless and consistent online experience—one that works no matter which Google product you’re using or what device you’re using it on. The new Google experience that we’ve begun working toward is founded on three key design principles: focus, elasticity and effortlessness.

  • Focus: Whether you’re searching, emailing or looking for a map, the only thing you should be concerned about is getting what you want. Our job is to provide the tools and features that will get you there quickly and easily. With the design changes in the coming weeks and months, we’re bringing forward the stuff that matters to you and getting all the other clutter out of your way. Even simple changes, like using bolder colors for actionable buttons or hiding navigation buttons until they’re actually needed, can help you better focus on only what you need at the moment.
  • Elasticity: In the early days, there was pretty much just one way to use Google: on a desktop computer with an average-sized monitor. Over a decade later, all it takes is a look around one’s home or office at the various mobile devices, tablets, high-resolution monitors and TVs to see a plethora of ways to access the web. The new design will soon allow you to seamlessly transition from one device to another and have a consistent visual experience. We aim to bring you this flexibility without sacrificing style or usefulness.
  • Effortlessness: Our design philosophy is to combine power with simplicity. We want to keep our look simple and clean, but behind the seemingly simple design, use new technologies like HTML5, WebGL and the latest, fastest browsers to make sure you have all the power of the web behind you.

Constant revision and improvement is part of our overarching philosophy. For example, last year we introduced an updated look and feel to our search results, and if you compare the original Google homepage to today’s version, you’ll see that a makeover every so often can certainly be refreshing.

Google’s design team promises a series of design improvements across all their products over the next few months, including Google Search, Google Maps and Gmail.

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