Rather than allowing a work site to be defunct, a developer partners with a restaurant to start a pop-up garden.

In New York City, spaces left empty by the recession have hosted temporary storesrestaurants, and museums. And now one company has put together a pop-up farm. In a complex just east of FDR Drive, rows of vegetables and herbs are thriving in black milk crates that can be picked up and transported at any time. Although a construction wall surrounds the farm right now, there are plans to build a white picket fence around the area and put a table in its center, where patrons can choose to eat. Diners will be able to sit among rows of squash, tomatoes, and basil and look up to see the Empire State Building just blocks away. Sarah Laskow/Good Magazine.

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