menu

US Tobacco Firms: New Government Warning Labels ‘Unconstitutional’

US Tobacco Firms: New Government Warning Labels ‘Unconstitutional’
Advertising

In line with the nation's campaign on smoking cessation, four large tobacco companies have sued the FDA over its new graphic warning labels.

Anna Brillon
  • 18 august 2011

Four large US tobacco firms are suing the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its newly-released smoking warning labels, which should be implemented in all cigarette packaging by September 22, 2012. The complaint is in part about the ‘unconstitutional’ requirements imposed by the FDA, including the graphic images that are to be posted on 50% of cigarette packaging in the US.

The FDA has released nine new government warning labels, which include images, text warnings, as well as a toll-free number to call for quitting smoking. Some of the pictures that will soon be seen on cigarette packs feature a man with a hole in his throat, a man with his chest sewn in stitches, and lungs with decayed tissue. All of these are part of the ongoing FDA anti-smoking campaign that has been in action since 2009.

The four companies, Lorillard, Inc., RJ Reynolds Tobacco Co., Commonwealth Brands, Inc., and Liggett Group LLC, stated in their lawsuit,

Never before in the United States have producers of a lawful product been required to use their own packaging and advertising to convey an emotionally charged government message urging adult consumers to shun their products.

To date, the FDA has not commented on the lawsuit.

Aljazeera: US Tobacco Firms Sue Over Graphic Labels

+#advertising
+#retail
+Advertising
+consumer goods
+Design
+Design Update
+Education
+Environmental / Green
+Retail
+USA
+Work & Business
Trending

Los Angeles Is Now Home To World's First Sneaker Dry Cleaning Service

Fashion
PSFK MEMBERSHIP


JOIN RETAIL INTELLIGENCE PLATFORM
Get access to retail reports and 20,000 retail insights


LEARN MORE

TREND REPORT


FORECAST 2020
The Consumer Roles That Will Shape Our Future
 

DOWNLOAD NOW

Work Yesterday
Advertising Yesterday
No search results found.