PSFK Picks: Top Music Hacks That Are Changing The Face Of Entertainment

PSFK takes a look at technological interventions that reflect evolutions in personal entertainment channels.

Capitalizing on the ever evolving intersection of music and technology, Music Hack Day takes place every year to bring together established music technology companies and stellar young talent to come up with new iterations of how people and music interact. The event, which was organised by The Echo NestTokbox, and Microsoft’s Rdio, took place in San Francisco last week.

Here are some highlights with a focus on how entertainment channels — especially the new manifestations of radio — are becoming increasingly personalized.

  • SeatTrip by Alexandre Passant is quite possibly the most unique in its vision. His platform is a hybrid of Tripit and Seatwave, as it sends users a customized list of shows and based on their plane ticket and travel information, providing an instant resource for tourists looking for instant entertainment.
  • Music Smasher by Matt Montag searches across numerous streaming music sources to help people find music they like. It also seems to work well for finding more obscure bands and artists.
  • BMV (Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis) (pictured above) by Ian McKellar is a suggestion to improve Rdio and Rovi’s search schema for classical music. It was built with the intention of improving searchability of movements within classical pieces and the profiles of orchestras, composers, conductors, soloists, and the classical music community at large.
  • Turntable.fm Extended developed by Mark Reeder and Adam Creeger for the growing social music platform Turntable.fm. The browser add-on, which already contains numerous other functionalities, now has extensions that adds concert calendars and lyrics.
  • PlayHead looks to provide a local, genre-based internet radio and social music discovery application. Users can create playlists on-the-go by simply telling the app where they are and the artist they are interested in.
  • Hearts.fm curates a radio station based on users’ favorites from Soundcloud, Last.fm and Ex.fm. It’s largely driven by the sharing of playlists, which users create using Soundcloud, Last.fm, and exfm.
  • Audible Harvest by Peat Bakke finds new music and track listings across users’ social networks. It notes what your friends are listening to, who discovered an emerging artist first, and provides information on which networks are the most influential.

Music Hackday San Francisco

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