Design Creative Of The Week: Matt Shaw [Product/Industrial/Spatial]

The hottest new talent of the week brought to you by PSFK x Arts Thread. This week a young designer who creates modern furniture with a nostalgic twist.

PSFK’s creative of the week, chosen from the ARTS THREAD online portfolios, is Matt Shaw. Matt graduated from Manchester School of Art MMU with a BA (Hons) in Three Dimensional Design.

Why we like Matt Shaw’s work: Matt’s pieces appear very simple, but are created from a good knowledge and understanding of manufacturing and design. We also like the mix of bright colors and neuturals.

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The Nostalgic Times clock was designed with instant recognition in mind and by leaving its simple construction on show coupled with the vibrant acrylic colours the clock has an honest, playful character. The clock consists of fifteen laser cut components, clock face, H/M/S hands and time module.

PRESS stool, Matt Shaw

The PRESS stool was designed and produced with the notion that a product could be constructed with “no nails, no screws, no glue”. It occurred to me that tension could be used to hold individual components together to create furniture. Previously working within labouring companies I had noticed, not only the efficiency of ratchet straps and cam buckles, but the beauty of their industrial character. This became the foundation of the project.

The subtle curvature within the seat top suggests that the stool is under stress from the webbing, pulling the wood into shape, while the steel frame provides a sturdy platform to sit upon. The webbing straps come in a variety of different colours to suit the surrounding environment or your personal preference.

The stool consists of a CNC wire bent frame (12mm steel rod), prefabricated and steam bent seat (locally sourced solid oak) and a 5 tonne webbing strap with steel cam buckle.

Table 325, Matt Shaw

Table 325 grew out of extensive structural exploration and experiments. All components were manufactured and fabricated by various companies in and around Manchester: Lazarian, City Glass, Chorlton Glass, J.E. Gordons, Håfele and APC Powder Coating.

Until very late on within the design process, the specific type of furniture that it would become was undecided. This allowed for a freedom when making decisions and enabled me to focus upon its structural aesthetics and solidity. An honest character developed by leaving the tables unusual and interesting construction on show as a feature.

Table 325 consists of a toughened glass top, discreet clear rubber bumpers, turned and fabricated solid ash legs, two spot welded metal frames with hidden threaded rod and hexagonal sleeve nuts.

See more of Matt’s work here.

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