menu
Get a daily delivery of PSFK
Subscribe to get a daily digest of new ideas and discoveries and to find out about upcoming events

Ai Weiwei Installation Uses Antique Wood From Dismantled Qing Dynasty Temples

Ai Weiwei Installation Uses Antique Wood From Dismantled Qing Dynasty Temples

'Fragments' is a seemingly chaotic structure made from reclaimed wood that resembles the borders of a map of China when viewed from above.

Emma Hutchings

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s installation ‘Fragments’ features in an exhibition at the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. He transformed pillars and beams of reclaimed ironwood from several dismantled Qing dynasty temples into a large-scale and seemingly chaotic structure. Yet when the piece is examined more closely, you see that it is an elaborate system of masterful joinery and delicate balance relations. When viewed from above, the entire installation is anchored by poles marking out the borders of a map of China.

Ai Weiwei Installation Uses Antique Wood From Dismantled Qing Dynasty Temples

Perspectives: Ai Weiwei is being presented at the same time as a retrospective of the artist’s works at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and runs through to April 7th 2013. You can view a time-lapse video of the installation of ‘Fragments’ below:

Perspectives: Ai Weiwei

{{post.author_display_name}}
  • {{post.date_formated}}
{{post.author_display_name}}
  • {{post.date_formated}}
Read More Tap to Expand
PSFK Writer {{post.author_display_name}}
  • {{post.date_formated}}
Get a daily delivery of PSFK
TREND REPORT

PSFK Labs Presents
The Future of Connected Life

Live Work Play Better
The New Consumer and Their Journey to Effectiveness, Balance & Personal Growth