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Get Every Drop Of Ketchup Out With MIT-Created Bottle Coating

Researchers have developed LiquiGlide, a new 'super-slippery' coating that helps condiments easily slide out of their containers- no tapping required.

Allie Walker
Allie Walker on May 25, 2012. @NYC_Allie

Can’t get that last bit of ketchup out of the bottle? Forget trying to get it out by scraping it out with a knife or by tapping tirelessly on the magic ’57′ spot on the side of the bottle- MIT researchers have created a bottle coating technology that makes ketchup simply glide out without any effort.

MIT PhD candidate Dave Smith and a team of researchers and nano technologists from MIT’s Varanasi Research Group have created LiquiGlide, a non-toxic, edible, and ‘super-slippery’ coating for the inside of bottles. The flavorless LiquiGlide coating is made from FDA approved food materials, and won’t mix with the ketchup or any other condiments.

The slippery coating has been tested on multiple condiments across a variety of container materials- so far, whether it’s ketchup, mayonnaise, or jam in a glass, plastic, metal, or ceramic container, LiquiGlide works effortlessly to get out every last drop.

Simply tilt a bottle upside down and watch the ketchup start to flow- zero sticky residue will remain on the sides of the bottle- a big win for frustrated ketchup lovers, but an even bigger win for the environment. When most people throw out a bottle of ketchup (or any condiment), there’s usually a little bit leftover at the bottom or along the sides– what seems like a little bit of waste quickly adds up when you consider how many condiments the average person keeps in his refrigerator.

Smith sees big potential for LiquiGlide in helping eliminate waste:

It’s funny: Everyone is always like, ‘Why bottles? What’s the big deal?’ But then you tell them the market for bottles–just the sauces alone is a $17 billion market. And if all those bottles had our coating, we estimate that we could save about one million tons of food from being thrown out every year.

Smith and his team also estimate that using LiquiGlide would also eliminate the need for large squeeze caps for condiments, saving about 25,000 tons of petroleum-based plastics each year.

Watch a video of the old way to coax ketchup out of a bottle and the new LiquiGlide way:

LiquiGlide

TOPICS: Environmental / Green, Science, Work & Business
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Allie works in-house at PSFK as the content curator, researcher, and daily writer. A former analyst for the National Geographic Channel and OWN, all things media and advertising have her heart. When she's not busy researching the latest trends, you can find her running or updating her personal blog, JustAllie. She is also a regular contributor to Advertising Week.

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