Triple Pundit: How Biking Has Become Part Of Levi’s Brand Culture

Jason McBriarty shares how cyclist commuter culture at the denim company has grown to be an integrated part of its ethos.

Biking to work does more than offer a more sustainable way to commute and good daily exercise – it can directly contribute to business innovation and a thriving culture.

A bit of perspective: I’m a lifelong biker. My dad gave me my first commuter bike in 1987. I was quickly hooked by the rush I got sailing down the winding New Hampshire hills and how the early-morning air felt pumping through my lungs.

Through the years I’ve kept up that same bike with repairs and tune-ups. And to this day, it’s my most prized possession.

Biking, for me, has become more than my primary form of transportation – it’s a lifestyle. Most days, I bike to work. When I don’t, I usually walk or take public transportation. My wife and I share one car, though she’s the main driver. I’ve even planned my career around employers I could cycle to.

Now, I bike to work at Levi Strauss & Co., where I’ve joined a community of bike enthusiasts. For me it’s a fun way to connect with colleagues sharing a similar passion. There’s a camaraderie that naturally develops when you’re locking up your bikes together or swapping repair tips.

In fact, it was through everyday bike-room conversation that a few members of our Levi’s brand team dreamed up design changes they’d love to make to their jeans.  Before long, the same bikers were road-testing prototypes with higher backs, reflective tape, U-lock waistbands and odor-resistant fabric. Eventually, these jeans became part of the Levi’s 511 Commuter collection.

(Original article by  Jason McBriartyContinue reading here.)

Originally published on Triple Pundit, republished with kind permission.

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