Does Anyone Really Care About The LinkedIn Password Hack?

Does the muted reaction to LinkedIn’s biggest security violation to date suggest that the professional networking site has lost its way and needs to ‘up its game’?

There’s an interesting reaction in the British Telegraph newspaper to the theft of 6.5 million passwords from LinkedIn. The paper says that the muted reaction to LinkedIn’s biggest security violation to date suggests that the professional networking site has lost its way and needs to “up its game.”

It is still the top site for recruiters posting jobs and people seeking jobs to see new opportunities… but where it falls down massively is how it facilitates meaningful connections between the most important people: its users. Many users tweeting about the hack have bemoaned how much trying to ‘network’ on the site is too much like work.

And indeed, many others have also complained about how very annoying LinkedIn’s constant email barrages are reminding its users someone wants to connect with them.

Perhaps, one user wrote, LinkedIn could have put its email skills to better use by immediately informing its users of the security breach and advised them on how best to protect their account.

Ironically LinkedIn, the networking site for professionals, failed to behave professionally this week by choosing to stay silent for as long as it did about the breach.

Telegraph

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