UK Bus Designer Creates The Guides For His Own Retrospective

Thomas Heatherwick, famous for creating the UK Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo and redesigning London’s iconic double-deckers, is honored with a retrospective.

The recently opened retrospective, Heatherwick Studio: Designing the Extraordinary, at London’s V&A Museum celebrates the work of British designer Thomas Heatherwick by showcasing a sampling of 140 of his studio’s projects from the last two decades.

Heatherwick created his Studio in 1994  ‘as a space in which to produce extraordinary projects.’ Heatherwick and his team create 3-dimensional work across a variety of disciplines, ‘from architecture, furniture, product design and fashion, to engineering, sculpture, transport and urban planning.’ The Studio’s works range from ‘Spun,’ a spinning chair, to redesigning the London bus, to designing the UK Pavilion at the Shanghai 2010 Expo.

His work pays careful attention to both the aesthetic and the functional, truly creating ‘extraordinary projects’ that stand out from their mundane competition- anyone can make a chair, but Heatherwick created a spinning, ergonomic, and beautiful chair. Specially made for the retrospective, Heatherwick created a machine that dispenses exhibit guides to visitors while simultaneously reminding them to be conscious of waste. Drawing inspiration from newspaper printing machines, Heatherwick likens his design to a ‘Doner Kebab’- a printing machine in the form of a circular tube of paper shrinks as visitors ‘print’ their guides, a visual representation not to take more than they need.

Watch the video of Heatherwick demonstrating the Exhibit Guide Printing Machine below:

Heatherwick Studio: Designing the Extraordinary will be open until September 30th at London’s V&A Museum.

Heatherwick Studio

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