Shepard Fairey Redesigns Rolling Stones’ Logo

The band’s trademark ‘tongue’ branding, first introduced in 1971 by John Pasche, gets updated in celebration of the milestone.

The Rolling Stones are one of rock-and-roll’s biggest bands– and front man Mick Jagger has one of biggest, and most memorable mouths in rock-and-roll history. John Pasche first immortalized Jagger’s mouth in his 1971 cover design for the Sticky Fingers album, which he saw as a way  ‘to represent the band’s anti-authoritarian attitude, Mick’s mouth and the obvious sexual connotations.’

The cover album art was so powerful that the band adopted it as their logo, and the ‘tongue’ has become the band’s trademark for the past 41 years; but to celebrate the Rolling Stones’ 50th anniversary, Mick Jagger reached out to American designer Shepard Fairey to update the logo. The new design features a slightly modified version of the iconic tongue and incorporates the band’s name and the number ’50’ in a creative way. Shepard, who has collaborated with Jagger before on album art, speaks about his decision to keep the trademark tongue front-and-center in the logo:

In my opinion, the Stones’ tongue logo is the most iconic, potent and enduring logo in rock & roll history. I think the logo not only captures Mick Jagger’s signature lips and tongue, but also the essence of rebellion and sexuality that is the allure of all rock & roll at its finest… [W]hen Mick Jagger reached out to me about designing a logo to mark the Rolling Stones’ 50th anniversary I was quite overwhelmed. Mick said he was open to any of my ideas. One of the first things I asked Mick was, ‘Don’t you think the tongue HAS to be included?’ He responded, ‘Yeah, I guess it ought to be.’ Case closed. I was very humbled and honored to be asked to work on the 50th logo, so my objective was to service and showcase the Stones’ legacy rather than try to make my contribution dominant. (via)

John Pasche’s original 1971 design and Shepard Fairey’s 50th Anniversary design

Rolling Stones

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