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Graffiti Artist Recreates Google Street View Images Where They Were Snapped

Graffiti Artist Recreates Google Street View Images Where They Were Snapped
culture

For the ‘Street Ghosts’ project, artist Paolo Cirio pastes life-sized pictures of people randomly snapped by the search giant's cameras back in the spot they were captured.

Emma Hutchings
  • 25 september 2012

Artist Paolo Cirio’s ‘Street Ghosts‘ project takes the images of people collected from Google Street View and puts them back on the street. Cirio pastes life-sized color posters of people randomly snapped by Google back in the spot they were found, creating a unique kind of street art. They are printed on thin paper, cut along the outline, and then affixed with wheatpaste on the walls of public buildings that are available for art interventions. Cirio writes in a statement:

In this project, I exposed the specters of Google’s eternal realm of private, misappropriated data: the bodies of people captured by Google’s Street View cameras, whose ghostly, virtual presence I marked in Street Art fashion at the precise spot in the real world where they were photographed.

Creating Real-Life Graffiti From Digital Google Street View Images

This Google map shows the location of the original images and the street art posters in New York, London, and Berlin. Click through to see a selection of the ‘Street Ghosts’:

Street Ghosts

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