Waterfall Swing Makes Designs But Keeps Users Dry [Video]

A water installation for the World Maker Faire sends down a continuous stream that is timed to miss the swingers.

Playing on the swing set just got a lot more interesting – videos of the Waterfall Swing, a design for the 2011 World Maker Faire in New York, have gone viral on YouTube and Tumblr. The installation was created by Mike O’Toole, Andrew Ratcliff, Ian Charnas and Andrew Witte of Dash 7 Design. The first records two people swinging back and forth, narrowly avoiding the “rain” when they pass through the wall of water, which parts to let them through. The second shows the water stream spelling messages and creating designs, like hearts, dots and animated curving lines.

According to the designers’ website, the inspiration came from thinking about water interactions as space. In the words of the artists, this is how the swing is designed to work:

Water recirculates through 273 independently controlled solenoid valves at the top of the structure to create a wall of water. This water starts from a collection pool on the ground and is pumped up to a large pipe that feeds the solenoids. Sensors mounted on the swingset gather information about the angle and speed of each swing. That information is sent to a computer that predicts the action of the rider. The computer then creates a hole in the wall of water, allowing the rider to swing through without getting wet.

To see more still images of the installation and read more in-depth details about Waterfall Swing, click here.

Dash7Design

Image via Dash7Design

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