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CNN Lights Up Empire State Building With Real-Time Election Results

The news network introduces a highly visual way for New Yorkers to stay updated on the race to the White House.

Allie Walker
Allie Walker on November 6, 2012. @NYC_Allie

In NYC and want to watch the election results? Instead of watching real-time results on your TV or computer screen, all you’ll have to do is look up at the New York skyline. In partnership with CNN, the Empire State Building will use a new LED lighting system to show the running tally of each candidate’s electoral votes. The Empire State Building is regularly lit with various colors to celebrate important events or milestones, including past elections. On Election Day in 2008, the building’s lights were split for the first time, half red for McCain, and half red for Obama.

Tonight, the lights will be split once again for Romney and Obama, but for the first time, the lights will dynamically change throughout the night. As CNN projects the winner of each state and the electoral votes are allocated to either candidate, the strips of red and blue will act as a glowing tally, growing until one candidate reaches the needed 270 votes:

This occasion will mark the iconic Empire State Building’s first-ever use of their new custom LED panel technology, a state-of-the-art dynamic lighting system from Philips Color Kinetics that is unique to the Empire State Building and will allow the building’s façade and mast to change lighting scenes in real-time. The four-sided tower, which sits atop the building more than a quarter of a mile from the streets of Manhattan, will be illuminated in patriotic red, white and blue vertical stripes, while the mast will be lit in blue and in red on two sides each to represent President Obama and Gov. Romney’s respective electoral vote totals.

For those not in NYC, CNN will air live footage of the changing building, and when the winner of the 2012 Presidential Election is announced, the lights will instantly change to either all blue or all red.

CNN

Header image credit: Dan Nguyen

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