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Device ‘Steals’ Excess Power From Nearby Electromagnetic Fields

Device ‘Steals’ Excess Power From Nearby Electromagnetic Fields
technology

Dennis Siegel has built an 'Electromagnetic Harvester' that can use redundant energy to charge a battery.

Emma Hutchings
  • 16 january 2013

The ‘Electromagnetic Harvester’ was built by Dennis Siegel, a Digital Media student from the University of the Arts in Bremen, Germany. It takes advantage of the electromagnetic fields that surround us, tapping into them and storing the unused energy in a standard battery.

Device Harvests Energy From Electromagnetic Fields

By holding the harvester directly into the electromagnetic field, you can gain redundant energy from the power supply of devices like coffee machines and cellphones. Depending on the strength of the field, which is indicated by an LED on top of the harvester, it is possible to charge a small battery within a day.

Device Harvests Energy From Electromagnetic Fields

This system provides access to already exisiting but unused energy sources, and exploring these can “create a new awareness of the invisible electromagnetic spaces.”

Device Harvests Energy From Electromagnetic Fields

There are two types of harvester for different electromagnetic fields: a smaller harvester suitable for frequencies below 100Hz, and a larger one for lower and higher frequencies like radio broadcasts and Bluetooth.

Dennis Siegel

 

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