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3D Printed Plastic House Can Be Snapped Together In A Day [Pics]

Architects in London looking to build the first 3D printed house before the competition does.

Daniela Walker
Daniela Walker on February 15, 2013. @emptyofpocket

Just last month, Dutch architects unveiled plans to build the world’s first 3D printed house out of sand, with a construction time of 18 months. Now British architecture collective Softkill Design has announced they too are planning to build a 3D printed house, but theirs can be printed in three weeks and built in a day.

Rather than sand, the structure, known as the ProtoHouse, will be built out of highly fibrous laser-sinted bioplastic. The company does not see it as a race, they don’t even see the Dutch as competition. A member of Softkill Design, Gilles Retsin told Dezeen:

We actually don’t even consider that a 3D-printed building because he is 3D-printing formwork and then pouring concrete into the form. So it’s not that the actual building is 3D printed.

Their design will be entirely constructed from the printed material. What’s more there will be no need for any adhesive or bolting of any kind. Once the pieces have been printed, the house can be snapped together in one day. Said Retsin:

You don’t need any bolting, screwing, or welding on site. Imagine a Velcro or button-like connection. The pieces are extremely light, and they just kind of click together so you don’t need any other material.

It is likely we will only be hearing more about 3D printed houses in the future — with their cost saving potential and material efficiency, they could seriously challenge the traditional landscape of architecture.

See more of the ProtoHouse below:

Softkill Design

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