Using Tech To Provide Shoppers With Better In-Store Experience

With the help of partner iQ by Intel, PSFK looks at how technology is improving customer service.

For a while there it looked like online shopping was going to spell the end of bricks-and-mortar retail. And although Amazon is still selling like crazy and big box stores are succumbing to showrooming, there’s never been a more exciting time in the retail world. New technologies like interactive displays and shopper tracking allow a depth of engagement and personalization that’s impossible online, preserving the core human aspect of ‘real retail’ that makes in-person customer service so important. In this piece, created in partnership with iQ by Intel, PSFK looks at new tools retailers (and shoppers) can use to make the customer service experience exceptional.

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Even before setting foot in a store there are ways personalize your shopping experience. By submitting your information prior to a visit, you can help the customer representatives help you find exactly what you want, and get recommendations tailored just for you. Although online-only, Modcloth is a service that give customers one-on-one fashion advice based on past purchases and preferences. Physical retailers could easily adopt a similar model where via app or social login users submit their preferences and details, so when they arrive a tailored experience is ready and waiting for them, as if they were a regular. Imagine being greeted in your favorite store by name, with a selection of items just for you to browse (likely with a special discount) just for volunteering some information!

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The possibilities expand when geolocation and social mentions are thrown into the mix. Using shoppers’ public social media posts and publicly shared information data, retailers can target consumers who are near a store with context-relevant discounts and coupons. Fashion shopping app Snapette alerts users to specific items (shoes and bags for example) nearby, and companies can send them targeted information based on their preferences. For example, if you took a photo of some shoes you liked and tagged the brand, a shoe store having a sale could send you a message offering that exact pair at their discounted price. It’s a win-win.

Alternatively, let’s say a shopper didn’t plan ahead on going to a particular store, but is a regular, loyal customer. The retailer who has an idea of what the customer likes from their purchase history and social activity can anticipate exactly what the customer wants, and provide it when they signal for it. Fashion retailer Burberry is in the process of rolling out an always-on tracking feature called Customer 360 that monitors where a shopper has made purchases or mentions of the brand through Twitter. Service associates will have the right information to tailor their service specifically to customers’ preferences, while being mindful of their perspective about the brand and specific products they like. Creating such a customized in-store experience increases the chance of a sale and enhances the sense of value for the consumer.

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Besides preempting customers’ needs (which requires people to share information, something not everyone is comfortable with), businesses can use other new technologies to enhance the retail experience. How? With robots, of course.

To read how robots are enhancing the in-store experience, continue reading here at iQ by Intel.

With the help of iQ by Intel, PSFK.com is exploring how technology impacts our lives. iQ by Intel connects readers to the trends and discussions that are moving our planet forward. To read more inspiring stories about how technology is unleashing the world’s human potential to create a better future visit iQ by Intel.



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