Ballet School’s Architecture Moves With The Dancers Inside Of It

A concept building from the mind of a graduate student would come alive based on the movement taking place within it.

A graduate from Ecole Spéciale d’Architecture named Alice Labourel presented the idea of building that comes to life and much like any other living organism would be in constant motion. Motion that was dependant on what the inhabitants were doing at the time.

She calls her vision The Hidden Orchestra and says it would ideally be situated over the river in L.A. This way it would come into contact with various stimuli such as the river flooding and passing trains. Part of her reasoning relates to the fact most organisms need water to survive, and like any other, her building would have mills and pumps to put the water to good use.

Apart from functioning like a living creature, it would also have a physical structure resembling bones and other internal building blocks found in nature. One area for performance and another for practice, joined by a relaxation area.

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For other aspects of daily life, the building would most likely feature motion sensors and specific architectural designs allowing it to ebb and flow with people’s daily routines and movements. One striking example is the use of red paint in dance rooms which would burst if a dancer hits the floor too hard. Not only does this reinforce good technique for dancers, it would signify the building suffering an injury and the resulting consequences.

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Alice Labourel

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